The Sync Project Bridges Science, Design, and Art

They say that music can soothe the savage beast, but perhaps it can do even more than that.  While many people think of music as something to be enjoyed, the design team at The Sync Project are taking music in a different direction.  The field of music therapy, which studies the health benefits of music…

They say that music can soothe the savage beast, but perhaps it can do even more than that.  While many people think of music as something to be enjoyed, the design team at The Sync Project are taking music in a different direction.  The field of music therapy, which studies the health benefits of music in the field of medicine, has been around for several decades, but a lot of the tools for studying it are still in their infancy.

What the Sync Project Does

The Sync Project’s platform is able to map the characteristics of music in real-time in coordination with actual sensor data from patients.  This allows for objective measurements so that doctors can see the personal therapeutic effects that music can have on the individual.  Marko Ahtisaari, the new Chief Executive Officer on the project, couldn’t be more thrilled with the design outcome.  He says, “The Sync Project’s mission is to develop music as medicine. We are bringing together the scientists, technologists, clinicians and musicians of the world to accelerate the discovery of the clinical applications of music.” Ahtisaari had previously served as the Head of Design at Nokia and the CEO and co-founder of Dopplr, a social travel service.

Changing the Medical Design Scene

Part of what makes the Sync Project unique is its attempts to change the status quo in the field of medical technology design.  By opening their company up to new possibilities such as those offered through the field of music therapy, the designers are able to come up with ideas that may never have been considered before.  Innovation can be a difficult process especially in a field where new designs can be met with hesitation and even resistance.  The Sync Project, however, is showing people that those innovative leaps can yield huge results.

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