Prepare for Extreme Conditions with the Altitude Chamber

When travelling at high altitudes, the environment can change dramatically.  Not only can it get much colder, but the air gets thinner resulting in there being far less oxygen for the body to use.  While people are capable of surviving in these places, it can be a lot for the body to adjust to.  For…

When travelling at high altitudes, the environment can change dramatically.  Not only can it get much colder, but the air gets thinner resulting in there being far less oxygen for the body to use.  While people are capable of surviving in these places, it can be a lot for the body to adjust to.  For that reason, anyone who will be experiencing high altitudes has to be prepared for the experience so that they know what to expect, lessening the risk of panic or disorientation.  For this reason, proper test equipment is vital, and StudioRed helped to develop an effective altitude chamber for CVAC.

Increasing Performance and Safety

One of the greatest dangers for anyone in a high altitude environment is suffering hypoxia, this is damage to the body that results from a lack of adequate oxygen supply.  It can affect the entire body or only a small part of it.  The trouble with hypoxia prevention is that the symptoms can be different for each person.  For that reason, United States military personnel who fly aircraft at high altitudes must train in an altitude chamber every five years.  Some commercial airlines also have this requirement for their pilots.  People who plan to do high altitude mountain climbing will also choose to undergo this training in order to familiarize themselves with the process.

Creating a Better Product

StudioRed worked with CVAC to develop a new way to achieve these results.  The CVAC Altitude Chamber can simulate the conditions of altitudes as low as 200 feet and as high as 15,000 feet.  By creating a sleek, aerodynamic look, StudioRed was able to create a pod that was both comfortable and aesthetically pleasing.  A tight seal was absolutely critical to prevent any air seepage, and large plastic panels limit damage while still allowing access to critical components.

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